Tuesday, March 29, 2011

baby's first sheers


I've sewed up my first two dresses in sheer fabric! They are both rayon. The one on the right came first, from a 1930s pattern. The back is slit peek-a-boo style, but I haven't gotten around to sewing a little button at the top to close yet.

The other one is a 60s shirtwaist. I really love it and think I will wear it often (that's a first, in my sewing history). It's got a peter pan collar, cuffed short sleeves, and a big billowy skirt.

When I chose the fabrics, they seemed SO sheer, but with all the stitching and the facings, etc, they came out much less sheer than I'd imagined! There were some super super sheer fabric options that I was thisclose to selecting but balked at the last minute. So I'm thinking on doing another even sheer-er, maybe this time with a pin-tuck bodice.
Added a few sheer dresses to the shop too; check 'em out!

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

ELUSIVE PLATFORM JELLY



The other day I found this amazing pair of jellies. Anyone my age must remember the jellies craze in the 90s, and finding this pair made me realize how PERFECT jellies with a nice chunky heel will be this summer. And even more perfect, it goes right along with my sheer spring theme. Sadly this pair is too small for me, so it's in the shop, but I searched all over the internet like a crazy maniac for a similar pair for myself and it was nearly impossible!!


...but FINALLY I found this pair, which I can't WAIT to arrive!! Although I was really looking for clear (and GLITTERY, of course!) I really love the color of these. Thank God I found them, cause I was really going out of my mind with searching. I must have bought them like 5 minutes after they were listed, seriously. So good luck, you guys.
oh, these ones are on ebay...i thought of buying them. they are cute but they dont have a chunky heel! AND i dont like those rhinestones. AND theyre expensive.

Thursday, March 10, 2011

ART DECO KIMONO

Machine-spun pongee silk woven with stencil-printed warp and weft threads (meisen)
Japan, early Showa period, 1930-40


So I used to work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. While I was there (2008) there was a great exhibit based on the book Fashioning Kimono: Dress and Modernity in Early Twentieth-Century Japan. All the Kimono were just breathtaking, and this morning I had been thinking of getting a nice vintage 20s Kimono, and I suddenly remembered the exhibit. Thought I'd share some of the pieces with you guys!

Machine-spun pongee silk woven with stencil-printed warp thread (meisen)
Japan, Taisho period, 1912-26
Gauze weave silk (ro) woven with stencil-printed warp threads
Japan, Taisho period, 1912-26
Machine-spun pongee silk woven with stencil-printed warp threads (meisen)
Japan, late Taisho-early Showa period, 1920-40
Gauze weave silk (ro) with stencil-printed patterning (kata-yuzen)
Japan, early Taisho period, 1912-20
Machine-spun pongee silk woven with stencil-printed warp and weft threads (meisen)
Japan, mid-Showa period, 1940-60
Hand-spun pongee silk (tsumugi) woven with stencil-printed weft threads
Japan, Taisho period, 1912-26
Silk-rayon blend with stencil-printed patterning (kata-yuzen)
Japan, late Taisho-early Showa period, 1920-30
Machine-spun pongee silk woven with stencil-printed warp and weft threads (meisen)
Japan, early Taisho period, 1912-20

Ramie (asa) with stencil-resist-printed patterning (katazome)
Japan, early Showa period, 1930-50

Machine-spun pongee silk woven with stencil-printed warp and weft threads (meisen)
Japan, early Showa period, 1930-50

Figured silk crêpe (omeshi chirimen) brocade-woven with lacquered threads (rama-ire)
Japan, Taisho period, 1920-30
Machine-spun pongee silk woven with stencil-printed warp and weft threads (meisen)
Japan, late Taisho-early Showa period, 1920-40
couldnt find details about this one, but it was in the show too

Sunday, March 6, 2011

H-AIR MAIL


I've been steadily adding to my 19th/early 20th c hairwork collection. I've loved these early 20th c. hair postcards for a long time, and just recently purchased my first two! They haven't arrived yet, but I just can't wait to hang them up. 


I don't know too much about the history of them, i.e. how or when this came about.... I only know that ladies would glue real human hair (theirs? I wonder if ever other people's?) onto the pretty heads of postcard images of women and send them out. I've only ever seen blonde, brunette, and near-black hair, but I would LOVE to see a good redhead! Often these strange and beautiful mementos were adorned with real ribbon or a little applique in the shape of a hairbow or hair accessory. So precious.
Here's a little collection of images I've gathered. Sorry many are blurry!
im currently trying to negotiate for the one on the right!! The ribbon around the neck totally reminds me of the ghost story 'the girl with the green ribbon' - does anyone remember that? i had a reading of it on cassette tape when i was little and would listen to it all day long. i was OBSESSED.

LOVE these ones. so totally creepy victorian style. and i love the fabric outfit glued onto the one on the left
oh wait, is that a redhead?? i cant tell



they often have this diamond-shaped yarn or string looped through, not sure why?

the one on the left is mine!!


the one on the right is mine!!




the one on the left is mine!! :D



Thursday, March 3, 2011

just a little visit from the vintage police..



Okay I feel a LITTLE bit like a jerk, but I emailed an Ebay seller today correcting a listing of theirs. Is that out of line? I can totally understand if you are some old lady and you just don't know, or you make a little error in the description, I mean usually we are all just making our best guess. That said, selling a 1960s Anne Fogarty dress with inside tag in tact as an antique Edwardian mourning dress??... that's just crazy!! PLEASE people just do the smallest little bit of research. If it has a tag, it ain't Edwardian. Just googling the name on the tag will reveal that Anne Fogarty was born in 1919 after the Edwardian era had ended and did not design a dress until the 1950s. The seller had many items for sale and seemed to be running an Ebay business. Not trying to be a huge snob, but let's be honest, no one looking for actual Edwardian clothing is gonna be stupid enough to buy that, and taking a well-meaning tip will help people (those who are looking for what the item REALLY is) to actually find and purchase that item. Okay, I'm done now, sorry.